Anatomy of a Roof in New Jersey

anatomy of a roof

1. Dormer: a framed projection through the sloping plane of a roof.
2. Downspout: a conduit for carrying water from a gutter, scupper, drop outlet or other drainage unit from roof to ground level.
3. Eave: a roof edge that extends out past the exterior wall line.
4. Gable: a triangular-shaped portion of the endwall of a building directly under the sloping roof and above the eave line.
5. Gable Vent: a vent place in a gable for use in conjunction with under-eave soffit ventilation to provide attic ventilation for a building. The vent system should be installed at a one to one (1:1) ratio.
6. Gutter: a channel (usually sheet metal) installed along the downslope perimeter of a roof to convey runoff water from the roof to the leader pipes or downspouts.
7. Hip: the external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
8. Leader Pipe: a conduit for carrying water from a gutter, scupper, drop outlet or other drainage unit from roof to ground level. Also known as a Downspout.
9. Rake: the sloped perimeter edge of a roof that runs from the eaves to the ridge. The rake is usually perpendicular to the eaves and ridge.
10. Ridge: the line where two planes of roof intersect, forming the highest point on the roof that runs the entire length of the roof.
11. Valley: the internal intersection of two sloping roof planes that runs from the eaves to the ridge. This intersection collects the most water run-off.

anatomy of a roof

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